TEACHING CULTURALLY-DIVERSE STUDENTS IN ENGLISH AS A LANGUAGE OF INSTRUCTION: TEACHERS’ LIVED EXPERIENCES

This study aimed at identifying, describing, and interpreting teachers’ lived experiences in teaching culturally-diverse students (CDSs) in English as a language of instruction (ELI). Hermeneutic Phenomenology was employed. Ten teachers volunteered to serve as participants. A semi-structured interview was the prime research instrument. Hence, reputable professors and researchers validated the interview questions. The study was conducted at Sultan Kudarat State University, Philippines. Thru rigorous Thematic Analysis, the study revealed that the teachers’ lived experiences were characterized by five relevant themes such as (a) Relevance of English to professional success, (b) Desirable functions of English, (c) Teachers’ pedagogical competence, (d) Substantial roles of code switching, and (e) Student’s problems in English. It was concluded that teachers’ lived experiences centered on English’s multidimensional significance and relevance to academic and professional success and differentiated language of instruction. The study suggests conducting further empirical studies on the ELI among students representing the Indigenous Peoples, technical courses, and non-education programs to unravel their experiences on ELI substantially.

Keywords: English, Language of Instruction, Phenomenology, Lived Experiences, Culturally-Diverse Students.

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